Fire by Kristin Cashore

So, to recap, I read and enjoyed Graceling. so it stands to reason I would get around to its sequels when possible.

Fire is not quite a sequel; in fact, chronologically speaking, it’s a prequel, and thematically, it’s just a shared-world story. But it’s the second book in the Seven Kingdoms series, which makes it presumably a followup book to Graceling. Certainly the one notable connection between the two books only makes dramatic sense if they’re read in the publication order.

To start with the good, Fire is excellently written, with the right level of detail and interesting themes. As in Graceling, women struggling with the burdens of power in a world unwilling to accept female empowerment is a major theme. The particulars are different enough to make the exploration from another angle rather refreshing: Katsa and Fire are very different personalities, having internalized quite different notions of responsible use of their power, guilt, and sexuality. Both are tempestuous, strong-willed characters, but they seem to be driven by nearly opposite forces. Having extensively explored emotional inhibition in her previous work, Cashore now deals with the perils and struggles of a far-too-open personality. So, thematically, Fire definitely works as a companion to Graceling, providing both counterpoint and common ground.

However, even so, the weakest aspect of Fire turns out to be its comparison to Graceling. It is somewhat less engrossing of a page-turner, and I might qualify it as significantly weaker in plot. Some of its weakness might derive from its shared-world aspect, as there is a peculiar cul-de-sac of a subplot which seems to have no real place in the story except in order to kludge in a character from Graceling (no details, as such would be a spoiler for Graceling, but it’s obvious from the prologue who I’m talking about).

The shared-world aspect in fact creates more problems than it solves, even above and beyond the dubious choice to try for character continuity. After all, the eponymous Seven Kingdoms of the series were entirely described in the first book; the addition of an extra kingdom and a region of roving sea pirates, both of which are cut off from the rest of the world by a conveniently impassible mountain range (which apparently gets passed twice, one of them in this story), feels a bit contrived. The presence of fantastical mind-controlling animals on this side of the mountains is also a bit problematic: in Graceling, mind control was a weird, exotic, and terrifying power, all while just on the other side of the mountains, shielding one’s mind from the commonplace seductive telepathic beasts is a basic survival skill. It’s weird from a worldbuilding point of view, and it’s weird from a population-genetic point of view.

But these are mostly places where Fire falls short of, or fails to properly mesh with, its predecessor work. Taken on its own merits, it’s really very good, except for the aforementioned shoehorned-in character. I remain favorably impressed by Kristen Cashore’s talent for a good story with intriguing characters, and I’ll read Bitterblue when the chance arises.

Advertisements

About Jake
I'm a mathematics professor at the University of Louisville, and a geek.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: